Curious about TNK-501...

Pumps and reservoirs
JoeM
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Curious about TNK-501...

Postby JoeM » Mon Aug 15, 2011 8:14 pm

So while trying to finalize the parts list for a new build I noticed one oddity regarding the TNK-501 res I was looking at:

Machined from a solid piece of acetal for maximum reliability, it has a thick acrylic window, front aluminum bezel, and stainless steel top cover.


Depending on the type of steel, this could vary quite a bit on the galvanic index, with some being almost noble in nature, and some being almost as bad as mixing in aluminum. So I looked a bit more, and it seems that Koolance uses stainless steel in the RP-401X2 res as well. Does anyone know what grade of steel is used here? Has anyone out there used one of these in a loop with the typical nickel, copper, or brass metals in the loop? Just looking to avoid damaging something here.

Izerous
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Re: Curious about TNK-501...

Postby Izerous » Tue Aug 16, 2011 10:09 am

If you have it in you possession take a magnet to the SS portion. Whether or not the magnet sticks tells you that the SS is above or below a certain grade.



If my memory servers me correctly magnets do not stick to higher grades of SS since they do not get blended with ferrous metals for higher grades.

my cookware at home is a SS/Titanium blended metal thus magnets should not stick.
el-cheapo SS BBQ probably will stick.
expensive SS BBQ should not stick.
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JoeM
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Re: Curious about TNK-501...

Postby JoeM » Tue Aug 16, 2011 4:16 pm

You know, I never knew that little fact. But reading up it looks like that's the major difference between 300 and 400 series stainless steels. 400 is still magnetic, i.e. poor quality junk, and the lower you go into the 300 series, the better it gets as far as corrosion resistance, and the less magnetic. It seems like the higher the concentration of chromium, the less magnetic. I seriously doubt Koolance would put low quality materials into their products, and I would sincerely hope that Koolance parts are designed and manufactured to work together, but it never hurts to double check (especially considering the corrosion fiasco another vendor experienced a couple months ago). Thanks for the tip!

ENTROPY
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Re: Curious about TNK-501...

Postby ENTROPY » Wed Sep 21, 2011 9:35 pm

First of all, galvanic corrosion only occurs between different metals in contact. It is not galvanic corrosion if a radiator tries to deposit itself in a water block--it is electrolytic (there is a distinction) which means other problems exist besides dissimilar metals. Also--it is improper to lump everything containing some aluminum into a generalized category. The tables for galvanic corrosion that you generally are looking at do not apply to alloys of aluminum some of which have very good properties. I'm not advocating alumninum radiators (or even copper rads) but the level of mythology circulating in the water cooling loops is a bit corroded itself. These days, aluminum rads actually have longer lifespans than their old copper cousins and the copper folks are doing their darndest to come up with competing alloys and processes to rival aluminum. It is important with aluminum radiators to maintain a basic ph generally as most are still suceptible to electrolytic corrosion (if you want to encourage it you would use an acid as in lead-acid battery). But when electrolytic corrosion does occur, there is always a major grounding problem--almost all early rad failures in autos are due to some forgetful or lazy mechanic not replacing ground straps or securing them properly when doing previous unrelated maintenance. In water cooling systems there is a propensity for electrical currents to be induced in the water flow that is carried in the boundary between the sufaces of the water and the tubing. The currents are induced as water (which is a conductor) passing through electrical fields which are bound to exist in most water blocks as well as other places within the computer. For sensitive and valuable instrumentation, it is common to use what is termed anti-static hose for this reason which has a ground wire embedded in the tubing. One uses metal fittings with this and ensures the ground wire contacts the fittings when they are made up. One would make sure fittings near the radiator which is most fragile due to its design contact the case which of course is already grounded--which would not be all that effective of course if your case was plastic.


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